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Ebooks

Argotist Ebooks is the publishing arm of The Argotist Online. We are no longer accepting unsolicited manuscripts.

 

Click on the links below to download.

 

 

 

Scratching Face

by Jake Berry

Scratching Face

Poems by Jake Berry that originally appeared as status updates at Facebook between May and September 2009.

 

Iron W

by Rich Curtis

Iron W

A series of thirty-five poems composed by Rich Curtis from found text. The found source material was a copy of the book Ironweed, by William Kennedy, that has been ripped in half, with the half that was attached to the spine of the book being used here.

 

 How To Live A Life 

by Martin Stannard

How To Live A Life

As may be inferred from the title, this poem by Martin Stannard is published in the hope that it will assist the complete idiot to understand the basic problems of living a life, and also help him or her to overcome them.

 

 

Moisture Surges

by Francis Raven

Moisture Surges

Moisture Surges by Francis Raven is a book of poems about water. There are three main sections divided by two conversations/plays and book-ended by a prologue and an appendix. The three main sections are: (1) a section on the metaphysics of water (2) a section on the biology and life of water and (3) a section on humanity's interaction with water. The prologue is a sonnet and the appendix includes resources about water. The two conversations/plays that break up the main sections are: (1) a play about the water shortage in the west that alludes to Plato's Apology and (2) a roundtable conversation with real philosophers on a possible philosophy of water.

 

 

The Ashes of Thoreau

by Chris Mansel

The Ashes of Thoreau

Chris Mansel writes like a man without a country. Each poem of The Ashes of Thoreau is a labyrinth of fragmentation and resolve. The projection is dense but difficult to abandon. Like cinema, it will leave you entertained by the time you step back into the light.

 

 

Neolipic

by John M. Bennett

Neolipic

158 poems (or barely constrained outbursts) written in the Spring of 2009 in which John M. Bennett tries to reformat the world with a swarm of linguistic distortions and formal jiggling, bursting out of the thin shirt of consciousness to reveal what's out there and also what's in there. The poems are textual, visual, aural, multi-lingual (English, Spanishor their simulacraand bits of French and Globbolalia). Unlike anything else written.

 

 

 An Archaeology of Theory

 

by Peter Ganick

 

An Archaeology of Theory

 

What is a text? After John Coltrane's wall of sound, we have here a wall of text. What does making sense entail? Is it in the words themselves and/or the sequence of words? In An Archeology of Theory, Peter Ganick suggests both and neither in true spatial reference. Energy is space is a version here-to-be-read.

 

 

 Experimental Sex Hospital

 

by Todd Swift

 

Experimental Sex Hospital

 

Todd Swift’s Experimental Sex Hospital is the ebook sequel to his critically acclaimed, Mainstream Love Hotel. Shadowing that previous work, the poems here deepen and lengthen the poet's exploration of desire and devotion, and, aesthetically, the tension between innovation and tradition in contemporary poetic styles. As in all Swift's work, musicality, sense of form, and wordplay fuse with elevated and street-level tones that create a zany, risk-taking book-text that interrogates ideas of self-identity and poetics, with an earnest eroticism. Barely literature, or literally bare, these are poems that enjoy walking naked with a flamboyant display.

 

 

Sparagmos Never Mind the Via Negativa

by Jim Leftwich

Sparagmos Never Mind the Via Negativa

 

The word is flesh. Tear it apart, syllable by syllable. Tear the syllables apart, letter by letter. There is no longer any need to begin with the word. We have already torn the letters apart. The word made flesh, the letters made noise... Eat itraw. Jim Leftwich's Sparagmos Never Mind the Via Negativa was written in May 2010 using a Logitech EX 100 keyboard. It is a text, but it is not a text about reading.

 

 

  Closing Eyes Blazing Life 

by Sarah Ahmad

Closing Eyes Blazing Life

 

Sarah Ahmad's Closing Eyes Blazing Life consists of neo-vignettes fabricated from the chaos of absurdity that is the background noise to the human experience, and which encircles us like a demented throng.

 

 

Playz

by Alan Sondheim

Playz

 

In Playz by Alan Sondheim, extreme base desires take over base desires, control becomes politics becomes control, and zaniness is exposed as violence, sex, arousal and betrayal.

 

 

 Sharks of Mary Shelley 

by Jeff Harrison

Sharks of Mary Shelley

 

Jeff Harrison's Sharks of Mary Shelley explores the subterfuges and circumscriptions of the authorial persona before a backdrop of cannibalised historical identities filtered through the ventriloquism of poetic utterances.

 

 

 Stories Short and Strange

by Bill Drennan

Stories Short and Strange

 

Stories Short and Strange is the first volume of a unique collection by Bill Drennan. These tales are typically laced with blends of absurdist science fiction, satire, childish cartoonism and black space humour.

 

 

King Amour

by Jack Foley

King Amour

 

Jack Foley's King Amour is a series of amour-plated adventures that take the rider on a fifty-year journey in a soi-disant con-sciousness that takes itself serially and postulates both pos and impostures in a grand, grad granulation of mic and picturation. The Kong is dead, but the Konig kicks. Who but Amour would dorothy these ravings? As the great, inspiring, and possibly loony Samuel Greenberg wrote, 'The blue, faded purple, horizon mount / Seemed to bellow the valleys in mists / Of enriching, ensuing, divine shadowings... / Where may this be?'

 

 

Brainiography

by Evelyn Posamentier

Brainiography

 

In Brainiography Evelyn Posamentier creates a dreamscape in which objects become animate and humans objectified, both inhabiting a marginal realm between physical and virtual dimensions. In language that is neither pre-modern nor postmodern, a compelling narrative brings language to a turning point. Here is poetry responsive to encounters with world and technology—brutal and immediate. A new form of witness.

 

 

Light as a Fetter

by Chris Stroffolino

Light as a Fetter

 

Chris Stroffolino’s Light as a Fetter is a collection of poems inspired by Cliffs Notes. A collection that John Ashbery has described as 'carelessly brilliant'.

 

 

 A Year of Ordinary Moments

by Rich Curtis

A Year of Ordinary Moments  

As a performance art piece, Rich Curtis became a licensed notary public in 2009. Since that time he has notarized many things, none of which have been legal documents. Curtis is fascinated by the idea of being legally bound to TRUTH. His personal view that truth is inherently subjective runs counter to the notion of a legal and absolute truth. As part of this project he devised an exercise of witnessing one true thing each day. For the most part Curtis tried to pick the most obscure, least significant event of a given day. He distilled each of these moments into one sentence. The result of this is A Year of Ordinary Moments, where the body of the text is the result of his daily observations.

 

 

Pesticide Drift

by F. A. Nettelbeck

Pesticide Drift  

A thirty-six-page sequence from F. A. Nettelbeck's blog, Sewing Memory, written between 2007 and 2010, Pesticide Drift presents Nettelbeck as both perpetrator and victim in the death of poetry and scandalizing myth.

 

 

Noise Difficulty Flower

by J. D. Nelson

Noise Difficulty Flower

 

Scratch-n-sniff the strange fragrance of J. D. Nelson's Noise Difficulty Flower. These 25 science fiction-scented surrealities were written between 2007 and 2010.

 

 

Solzhenitsyn Jukebox

by Ann Bogle

Solzhenitsyn Jukebox

 

Ann Bogle's Solzhenitsyn Jukebox is a collection of stories where texts create themselves out of shreds of recollections, leaps of logic, and the constant self-adjustment of narrative imperatives; spinning themselves out in the process of going along under their own momentum. This is akin to what the critic and culturologist Mikhail Iampolsky referred to as the poetry of "caresse".  

 

 

Portions of Conversational Assemblies

by Felino A. Soriano

Portions of Conversational Assemblies

 

Portions of Conversational Assemblies by Felino A. Soriano are ekphrastic interpretations of various jazz recordings, and part of the larger, dedicated series of poems Soriano has dedicated 2010 to composing.

 

 

Doom Cusp

by David Meltzer

Doom Cusp

 

Doom Cusp by David Meltzer is dedicated to the California artist Wallace Berman who was one of Meltzer's mentors when he became exiled there from Brooklyn. Berman's use of the Hebrew alphabet and especially the Aleph in his collages, reminded Meltzer of the presences of the Holocaust and seemed relevant today in the midst of another series of Holy Wars and their ultimate futility.

 

 

Old Women Look Like This

by Susan M. Schultz

Old Women Look Like This

 

Inspired by a series of paintings by Elizabeth Berdann, Old Women Look Like This by Susan M. Schultz is about very old age. Schultz tests the comparison of old age to childhood by placing old people into unexpected narratives, including children's stories, among them Pippi Longstocking and Diary of a Wimpy Kid. An imaginative off-shoot of her Dementia Blog (Singing Horse, 2008).  

 

 

Symphony No. 2

by Ric Carfagna

Symphony No. 2

 

Symphony No. 2 by Ric Carfagna (and a follow-up to his Symphony No. 1) is a work not to be construed as a symphony in a strictly classical sense, as is the case with the symphonic forms of works by Mozart or Haydn, but more along the lines of works by obtuse unwieldy 20th century composers such as Norgard, Nystroem, Segerstam and Pettersson. It comprises not so much of thematic elements as it does the repetition of images in differing contexts. It starts off with a burst of dissonance then settles down into a placid, surreal, disjunctive utterance. It also attempts to conjure up the ghosts of cubist poetry (a short lived and little known poetic phenomena) with Carfagna’s own idiosyncratic spin on it.

 

 

Paradigm of the Tinctures

by Steve McCaffery and Alan Halsey

Paradigm of the Tinctures

 

This revised and expanded edition of Paradigm of the Tinctures by Steve McCaffery and Alan Halsey revisits the classic humanist idea of the Sister Arts where poetry is understood to be a speaking picture and a picture a silent poem. The revisitation, however, is bluntly revisionary and the result is a fresh text-graphic dialogue.  

 

 

Disturb the Universe: The Collected Essays of Adam Fieled

by Adam Fieled

Disturb the Universe: The Collected Essays of Adam Fieled

 

In Disturb the Universe: The Collected Essays of Adam Fieled, we see a young poet wrestling with old problems: how to move forward and conserve simultaneously, how to form coherent judgments regarding what will endure and what will not, how to, as Eliot wrote in Four Quartets, ‘purify the dialect of the tribe’. These essays are bold stabs in search of new directions, which push the envelope past what post-modernism in poetry has heretofore allowed. They may prove to be enduring benchmarks of a period of transition and turmoil.  

 

 

Soddoma: Cantos of Ulysses

by Chris Mansel

Soddoma: Cantos of Ulysses

 

Soddoma: Cantos of Ulysses is a travelogue of the grotesque. A linguistic equivalent of a painting by Hieronymus Bosch or Francis Bacon, it distorts, exaggerates and polarises the familiar world to such an extent that our senses are drawn inwards to escape the conflicts fashioned by such energies. As Mansel writes, ‘When confronted with conflict the mind re-enters the body. You are going where the smell is coming from’.  

 

 

Margin L

by Vernon Frazer

Margin L

 

The roots of Vernon Frazer's textual poetry lie as much in the free jazz of John Coltrane, Cecil Taylor and their successors as they do in language-centered poetry, Surrealism, Dada and abstract expressionism. In Margin L, Frazer's words and concepts play over the page until they create a sense that something has happened during each poem’s movement. The poems, however, leave their interpretation of what precisely has happened up to the reader.  

 

 

The Jigoku Zoshi Hells: A Book of Variations

by Jerome Rothenberg

The Jigoku Zoshi Hells: A Book of Variations

 

Jerome Rothenberg's The Jigoku Zoshi Hells: A Book of Variations is a series of new poems following the method of composition Rothenberg had previously used in "The Lorca Variations" and in homages to the work of other poets and artists. In the present set he applies the same procedure to an early work of his own, "The Seven Hells of the Jigoku Zoshi" (1962) – not to annihilate the original but to bring it into a new dimension, where both versions can lead an independent if interlinked existence. The fifty year gap between them adds its own strangeness to the mix. 

 

 

 Impressive (Big) Instant (Bang) !

by Ivan Arguelles

IMPRESSIVE (BIG) INSTANT (BANG) !

 

Meant to be read in one breath Impressive (Big) Instant (Bang) ! requires the reader to give up any notion of syntactic coherency while at the same time adhering to the concept of narrative fluidity. We are in the single and only moment of creation, the Big Bang, when falling in love becomes the obsessive reiteration of a unique poetics, that of being obliged to surrender the Self, forging an oblivion of the skin. While the text can be read as a footnote to its immediate predecessor Madonna Septet, it remains stubbornly on its own, an amalgam of madness and intuition about Light and its myriad fragments.

 

 

Tracking Systems

by Alan May

Tracking Systems

 

In Tracking Systems we see a world (not completely unlike our own) full of threat and the attending paranoia. Populating this world: Stetson Kennedy, Benjamin Franklin, Don Knotts, Gandhi, and an assortment of birds, bears, coyote, and a few beings of the less ordinary, more mythical variety.  

 

 

 Some Geographies

by Mark Young

Some Geographies

'These pieces by Mark Young have a disturbing and comic speed, and seem, as a group, to get at some essential weirdness of the 'global' info-capitalist culture we're all trying to survive and live in'. Sam Lohmann (editor of Peaches & Bats)

4NDd2O

by Jukka-Pekka Kervinen

4NDd2O

4NDd2O is a text composed and generated by an old 8-bit computer, ZX Spectrum 48. The text consists of partial memory dumps, stochastic manipulations and character encoding processes, all written by an author using native Basic language offered by ZX Spectrum.  

 

 

Yin & Yang Eat at Me

by Jesse Glass

Yin & Yang Eat at Me

 

A play about language.

 

 

Museless Now Fay Wray

by Michael Basinski and Ginny O’Brien

Museless Now Fay Wray

 

  Museless Now Fay Wray is a collection of poems in three sequences. The poetries are juxtaposed fragments composed to conceal and reveal by focus and out of focus musical constellations. There is rhythm first rather than the arrogance of meaning. They are to be ancient.

 

 

A Fool in the Pack

 

by Bariane Louise Rowlands

A Fool in the Pack

 

A Fool in the Pack by Bariane Louise Rowlands is an exploration in vocabulary, metaphor and free form, expressing adoration and respect for nature and animals, as well as expressing sadness at the lack of respect, honesty and love between human beings. Many of the poems are pseudo-sexual/sensual, which partially reflect the confusion that can accompany a too early exposure to sexuality.

 

 

Royal Blue Car

 

by Evelyn Posamentier

 

Royal Blue Car

 

Evelyn Posamentier's Royal Blue Car takes you to the core of the red thread of life, in words that are given to you as grains: vivid drops of soul.

 

 

Odds Against Today

 

by Vernon Frazer

 

Odds Against Today

 

In Odds Against Today Vernon Frazer's linguistic techniques force language beyond semantic limitations to produce poems that become events rather than meanings, although his lexical admixtures do not necessarily preclude perceiving or experiencing meaning.

 

 

Odd Fish

 

by G. E. Schwartz

 

Odd Fish

 

In Odd Fish we encounter Constantine Samuel Rafinesque, a 19th century American naturalist learned in ichthyology, botany, malacology, anthropology and linguistics whose field notes set out to, as Adam did, name the world he walked through, one circumlocution at a time.

 

 

yumdZ

 

by Jukka-Pekka Kervinen

 

yumdZ

 

yumdZ is a computer-generated process, a self-regulated stochastic text written using old 8-bit computer, Atari 65XE, as the only source. The text is composed of random bytes, memory dumps and characters mapped to Atari's own ATASCII set, a near-chaotic travel inside to the computer's memory, instead of metaphorical we are traveling literally to the world of the hexadecimal numbers, POKE/PEEK commands and 6502 processor assembly opcodes. This book is a document of the trip.  

 

 

A Short Treatise on the Nature of the Gods

by Dan Beachy-Quick

A Short Treatise on the Nature of the Gods

 

A Short Treatise on the Nature of the Gods takes the distance between human reality and godly ideality as its primary crisis. Each poem is its own discrete meditation complicated by its link to other such poems, all building not toward conclusion, but a clearer sense of difficulty.

 

 

Inner Voices Heard Before Sleep

 

by Michael Ruby

 

Inner Voices Heard Before Sleep

 

In Inner Voices Heard Before Sleep, Michael Ruby transcribes voices that are accessible to consciousness in the last seconds before sleep. There are 70 transcription sessions, each ending with the poet falling sleep. The origin and significance of the voices are undetermined.

 

 

Periods

 

by Joel Chace

 

Periods

 

Periods by Joel Chace was inspired by an insight he had in 2010 that, as he says, ‘Periods complete sentences, which are complete periods’. Of this he says, ‘this sentence seemed to express two different ideas about periods (and about sentences). Once I realized what this statement suggested, I was intrigued to begin finding and creating more sentences, more ideas about periods—a collection that has grown into this sequence’.  

 

 

Empirical and Non-Empirical Identifiers

by Jeffrey Side

 

Empirical and Non-Empirical Identifiers

 

A look at the ways in which aspects of mainstream poetic composition practices limit ambiguity and a reader-response approach to the reception of poetry. 

 

 

Respondings

 

by Martin Stannard

 

Respondings

 

Respondings is the second collection of poet Martin Stannard's reviews and writings about writing, this time selected from pieces published between 2004 and 2007. Often controversial and brutally honest, and never courting popularity, Stannard continues to question poets, poetry and himself in an effort to find out whatever there may be to find out. Stannard's writing has often been called "witty and outspoken". Others have just said it's really clever and funny. It's always interesting.

 

 

Inshore Seeds

 

by William Allegrezza

 

Inshore Seeds

 

Inshore Seeds by William Allegrezza is split into four sections. The first section explores the intersection of language, meaning, identity, politics, and inconsistency, and the second reveals poetry as news articles without the news. The third section takes on the prose poem, and the fourth section plays with the dual image of kern from typography and military history, as if poetry is called to both.

 

 

Harmonia

 

by Don Share

 

Harmonia

 

Harmonia is the immortal goddess of concord and harmony. Despite the cheering poetry implied in that description, she was renowned for receiving a fatal necklace on her wedding day that brought misfortune to all who possessed it. More happily: harmonia is the natural state of being of all living things, according to Plato; it’s a genus of beetles, and of weeds, a particularly sublime Krautrock band; an asteroid. And, encompassing vibrations from all these juxtaposed things, it is also the title of this collection of slightly dissonant outfakes or B-sides (as he calls them) by Don Share.  

 

 

Country Without a Name 

by Ann Bogle

 

Country Without a Name

 

Of Country Without a Name, Morgan Harlow writes: ‘Ann Bogle’s latest collection of memoir fiction, is a sequence of thoughts, dreams and conversations. Here white petunias are cut with scissors to make a name, values are placed as if they were tarot cards, and approximations of the sublime are revealed in mathematical detail. Country Without a Name recalls the work of Dada poet Tristan Tzara (whose name means “country” in Romanian) and the semi-autobiographical pharmaceutical quests and cut-up text collages of William S. Burroughs. Bogle rebels, defines and ultimately defies hierarchies. Her writing, manifesto-like, hints at what might have been learned from Andre Breton’s Nadja if we had been given her diary to read, along with the idea that non-being dwells in language the same as being does, 

or in Bogle’s words: ‘Not to be she is embodied’.  

 

 

Mother Earth

 

by Adam Fieled

 

Mother Earth

 

Normal people tend to figure out what (and who) they want through relationships. Poetry in 2011 doesn’t always need to deal with the exalted, the archetypal, or (as is the case with post-modern poetry) the conditions and contexts of language itself. Poetry that configures the extraordinary through the normal is useful because it has utility value for an audience, largely middle and working class, that is being challenged by threatening external conditions, economic and otherwise. Mother Earth is an ordinary story with some pertinent implications; if it is read with understanding, it can function as allegory and its relationships stand as representations of the larger trends currently shaping our world.

 

 

A House in Summer

 

by Maxine Chernoff

 

A House in Summer

 

The uncanny and the daily blend in Maxine Chernoff's new collection, A House in Summer. From incantatory poems such as ‘Rune’ and ‘Commentary’ to the storied landscapes of ‘Parade’, ‘Aversions’ and 'A House in Summer', these large and generous poems ask the reader to confront a world

broken and made whole by language.

 

 

Fib Sequence

 

by Larissa Shmailo

 

Fib Sequence

 

Like the seeds on the head of a sunflower, the poems, translations, and story in Fib Sequence by Larissa Shmailo whorl according to a special pattern. Here you will find arachnids, jealous women, numbers, half-truths, a dangerous dictionary and a few naughty words. Enjoy your encounter.  

 

 

A Western Exile

 

by Matt Hill

 

A Western Exile

 

  A Western Exile comprises of ten prose poems, randomly composed and offered. Episodes from an incomplete life, vaguely recorded. Devoid of connective punctuation, intent to foster an effulgent flow.  

 

 

Werewolf Weather

 

by Larry Sawyer

 

Werewolf Weather

 

Using surrealist momentum to explore the possibilities of language, the poems in Werewolf Weather tear at the ‘curtain of nothingness’, as mentioned by Hughes-Alain Dal to reveal an egoless disquietness. Showing a mutability of identity, time and place in the actuality of words these fabulist poems celebrate the nostalgia of right now.

 

 

The Propaganda Factory

 

by Marc Vincenz

 

The Propaganda Factory

 

In these taut lyrical poems, Marc Vincenz navigates society through a Fellini camera capturing voyeuristic meditations and startling moments of flux. The citizens of The Propaganda Factory try to imagine what lies behind the Wall. Businessmen on the Brechtian stage yearn to speak of trees, Kafka’s secret police have an ear pressed to the glass, and ‘shadows drag behind like bats’.

 

 

Bowl of Light

 

by C. Brannon Watts

 

Bowl of Light

 

Bowl of Light is a collection of intersections, even collisions; the perspectives here move from adolescence to adulthood, and the poetry itself, in structure and spirit, reflects everything from moments of lyricism to abstraction and experimentation. The book is divided into four sections, each an arc of radius under the sky, a physical location, and a point along the journey to poetic and personal maturity. C. Brannon Watts' work is both personal narrative and intimate conversation with the reader; though there is aggression here, you should probably bring along your favorite hat, pipe, and personality. Just in case.

 

 

Apertures

 

by rob mclennan

 

Apertures

 

In apertures, the second book of poet rob mclennan's the other side of the mouth, he writes a variation on Vancouver writer George Bowering's Curious, a collection of poems composed for and about other poets. In apertures, mclennan composed pieces about the possessions of a variety of poets he has known, whether personally or only through their writings, over the past decade and a half. In eighty-three poems, mclennan writes the “stuff” of a list of both American and Canadian poets, riffing through each writer's individual language, resulting in a portrait of North American writing through the eyes of one of Canada's most active poet/critics.  

 

 

Callibration

 

by Keith Higginbotham

 

 

The poems in Calibration are about longing, dislocation, and the ultimate failure of language to adequately address the complexities and fears of ordinary life.

 

 

Dark Hope

by Vernon Frazer and Michelle Greenblatt

Dark Hope

As their divergent styles merge experimental language and personal experience into a rare musical synergy, Vernon Frazer and Michelle Greenblatt create a series of poems whose images of terror and darkness shadow dance across the page, their sinuous movements balancing a kernel of optimism that reveals itself as Dark Hope.

 

 

Woody Alliances Laundered

by Andy Brown

In Woody Alliances Laundered Andy Brown and William Wordsworth collaborate on 16 reinterpretations and variations of the most popular of English Romantic poems ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’. Among other questions, these witty and insightful new poems ask what if Dorothy Wordsworth were the original source of the poem; what if William vanished from the picture altogether; what does commerce and recession have to do with daffodils; and why is the Reverend Spooner out walking in Grasmere, conversing with rhyming Cockneys, Zen poet-monks, and archaeologists who have just uncovered the Rosetta Stone for Wordsworth’s original poem?

 

 

Articulating Space: Short Essays on Poetry

by Jessica Smith

Articulating Space: Short Essays on Poetry

Composed between 2000 and 2006, these short essays on poetry and poetics straddle the genres of traditional academic essay and manifesto. They include analyses of L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poetics (Andrews, Bernstein, DuPlessis, Hejinian, Howe, McCaffery, and Silliman) and poetry by Modernists Eliot, Stein, and Zukofsky; 19th Century poets Browning, Rossetti and Shelley; and contemporary poets Cecilia Vicuña and Christian Bök. Spanning 200 years of poetry and philosophy, Smith weaves a theory of the concomitance of space and time in language.

 

 

Grounds 

by Calvin Pennix

Grounds

 

Intermingling the imagined and the actual, Grounds reveals a common journey under the guise of untried language. Split into two parts, but carrying one narrative thread, Grounds challenges the reader, and provokes thought.

 

 

Slight Return: Remix and Ekphrasis 

 

by Robert Archambeau

 

Slight Return: Remix and Ekphrasis

 

What if Kafka had written the Kama Sutra? What if the rhetoric of manifest destiny were mashed up with the destruction of Hiroshima? What if the icons of punk and glam found themselves curled up with Sheena of the Jungle? What happens when a poet draws a lucky card in the Mexican lotteria? What if poems were made from the flotsam and jetsam of culture, high and low? What if the author really has died, as Roland Barthes told us he would, and been replaced by the scriptor, whose sole power is to mingle texts? What if Jimi Hendrix had only given us the last two words of ‘Voodoo Child (slight return)’? The questions, if not all the answers, are in the poems in Slight Return: Remix and Ekphrasis.

 

 

Endless, Beautiful, Exact

 

by Francesco Levato

 

Endless, Beautiful, Exact

 

A series of texts, remixed from appropriated oral and written source material, which explore interpersonal conflict through a fragmented and implied narrative. The author seems to have a clampdown on what he is willing to express, and what few words are allowed through are charged with emotion and tension.

 

 

Writing What For? Across the Mourning Sky

 

by Raymond Farr

Writing What For? Across the Mourning Sky

Executing techniques gleaned from Language poetry and its dada/surrealist roots; each poem is a box canyon of meaninglessness tipping its hat to the absurd. Literary expectations are dashed on the rocks of dire mismeaning, embellishing the nothing that seems an inherent folly, a joke intrinsic to "a turn of phrase." These poems succumb to the glossy experience of recreating the experience of reading these poems—a train of thought derailed again and again, until what is obvious becomes radiant/radioactive, but not meaning to "mean."

 

 

The Stories

 

by Ed Larrissy

 

A book about the provisional and untidy narratives we create every minute, and how these overlap with the sanctified narratives of society and religion. The world remains strange, but the strangeness infects the story.

 

 

Piso Mojado 

 

by J. D. Nelson

 

 

These 23 slip-resistant poems were written between 2009 and 2010 in Colorado, Utah, Nevada and California.

 

 

Outside Voices: An Email Correspondence

 

by Jake Berry and Jeffrey Side

 


This 18-month transatlantic email correspondence between Jake Berry and Jeffrey Side ranges across and intertwines a variety of topics that include: poetry and music; film and TV; the changes in culture over the past few decades; the differences in regional U.S. and U.K. accents; the difficulty of reaching the famous in order to interview them; the songwriter as poet and vice versa.

 

 

Songlines

 

by Iain Britton

 

 

These poems touch on the experimental, the alternative, and rely on space and imagery for impact, and should be treated as living entities. Each poem should take the reader on a journey. They are multilayered and many everyday themes interconnect them, and the use of mnemonics adds a strengthening dimension to the symbolism.

 

 

Lubbock Electric

 

by Anne Elezabeth Pluto

 

 

Anne Elezabeth Pluto's Lubbock Electric is a collection that takes us from the emerald parlor of Easter to the turquoise tower of The Three Kings – a pilgrimage of dust from the West Texas prairie to Central Asia –
calling forth the delicate bonds of love and death, and the memory that sustains them.

 

 

Snowlines

 

by Jack Alun

 

 

Snowlines is, at once, a poem and a series of poems in which perception and memory stutter to the edge of oblivion. Alun employs a taut, sparse but evocative style to direct the reader through a network of images and ideas into interiors of personal understanding. The variety of themes covered, including love, language and the ephemeral, incorporate as recurring echo into the bleakness of the landscape.

 

 

Of Oscillating Fathoms These Nonverbal Chants

 

by Felino A. Soriano

 

 

Of Oscillating Fathoms These Nonverbal Chants is a functioning interpretation of understanding environment; the basis of this understanding is found listening to the voices loudly unheard, and through honoring communication’s multilayered opportunities and comprehended freedoms.

 

 

From Outside

 

by A C Evans

 

 

From Outside (a selection of poems from 2006 to 2011) takes place at “the borders of the future”, where a solitary cyborg with metal arms stands waiting for another client. The dramatis personae are a cast of mad performers, misfits, hick comediennes, mutants, celebs, ghosts, undercover agents and the Eternal Bride from the Large Glass. The tutelary deity is pale-faced Hypnos: guardian of desperate poets and “you” (the invisible companion) or, perhaps, even “you” (the reader) relaxing on an old park bench, watched over by hunched black birds…

 

 

Aloha Mele

 

by Katherine Hastings

 

 

‘In this remarkable new book Katherine Hastings, as the title suggests, says hello to song: song of “A ceiling of stars”, “slow lava flow”, and a sensual iridescence that beautifully expresses Hawaiian love. Hastings does much more: the reader who begins to read these radiant words may start out “in the quenched hive of solitude” but soon finds her or himself “Afloat in naked beauty”, “Turned tenderly/toward/together”! Hastings is a poet of such skill and grace that the earth itself (in the spectacular form of Hawaii) achieves a lyric, singing voice in her work’. (Lee Slonimsky)  

 

 

Memory Fictions

 

by Lawrence Upton

 

 

Memory Fictions continues Lawrence Upton's (in his own word) restless investigation of renewing approaches to poetry. It is, in part, also a record of his recent formal exploration of notation (in this case of texts for two voices) to disambiguate typed text without being overly directive. The work is an affirmation by Upton of the importance of performance as the full realisation of a poem; poems written and presented to support performers inherently; and, in its structures and composition, it represents, though quietly, a new direction in his writing.

 

 

At Times Your Lines

 

 by Susan Lewis

 

 

The prose poems in At Times Your Lines muster compression and elision, irony and parable in the pursuit of the necessary impossible; tracing life and fault-lines between the lived and the created, the recognizable and the strange. “These poems are terse yet opaque, jokey yet unapologetically consequential... off-beat, perfectly tuned, and compulsively readable.” (Wayne Thomas, editor of The Tusculum Review). "With their gift for formal and stylistic compression, for condensation laced with startling shifts of speed and sound, these poems transform the necessary limitations of the coin of the realm into the making of virtuoso turns on a dime." (Robert Kaufman, University of California, Berkeley)

 

 

Was It Something I Said

by Meriel Malone

 

Meriel Malone’s Was It Something I Said, deconstructs the demotic with a wit and humour that exudes a certain charm, yet is occasionally disconcerting in its edginess. Coupled with this, is a linguistic turn of phrase that eases the reader into exegetic flights of fancy, and from there into “the haze of calculated space”, to quote from one of her poems.

 

 

Light on the Lion's Face

by Tim Van Dyke

 

 

The poems in Tim Van Dyke's Light on the Lion's Face are composed in conjunction with Jean Baudrillard's book, Seduction, often using fragments from the text as architecture for the poems. The other two architectural concepts are the Shivite myth of Kīrttimukha (or "Face of Glory"), a story about a ravenous lion eating its own body, and the stylistic renderings and fragments of Aime Cesaire. Tim Van Dyke uses these three points of departure to fashion a new sensibility about the body, love, seduction, society, and the continued relevance of myth and ritual.

 

 

Symphony No. 7

 

by Ric Carfagna

 

 

Symphony No.7 is a poetic meditation on the passage of time. Each of its eighty-eight numbered sections begins by isolating and framing an image of a moment resonating through an empirically based terrestrial reality. Here it is known that each moment is subject to the quantum flux of an observing mind’s cognitive awareness, and thus, each moment presented evolves according to the indeterminate and mutable potentialities inherent in the nature of its existence moving through an experientially perceived corporeal realm.

 

 

 Splice Poems 

by Dan Godston

 

This poetry collection splices together found texts with the poet’s lines, creating dynamic juxtapositions of images and language. The found texts include quotes by a biologist, writer, and musicians and composers, and these poems explore themes such as an artist’s identity and audience’s presence, jazz and improvisation, and cognition and the creative process.

 

 

Neither Us nor Them: Poetry Anthologies, Canon Building and the Silencing of William Bronk

by David Clippinger

 

The twentieth century witnessed the proliferation of the poetry anthology, and perhaps none was so instrumental in reshaping the poetry canon than Donald Allen’s New American Poetry, which introduced many readers to the Beat writers, the Black Mountain School, as well as New York City poets. Allen’s anthology was organized around a concept of poetry communities, and was one of the first to foreground group “identity” as a canonical practice. As most readers of Donald Allen’s groundbreaking anthology are aware, William Bronk is not included in the cast of poets assembled within The New American Poetry. But what might be surprising to many is that Bronk was invited by Allen to contribute to the anthology and he was the final person to be cut from the final manuscript. Neither Us Nor Them uses William Bronk’s poetry and letters as a window to survey the construction of The New American Poetry anthology—as well as an opportunity to explore the generation of poetry communities as vital to the canon making process. The case of William Bronk is, therefore, illuminating both in terms of the late 1950s/early 1960s poetry scene as well as in the canonical debates that have occurred since then and rendered materially at the level of the anthology.

 

 

Windows without Dreams

by Daniela Voicu

Windows without Dreams captures the sheer joy of living. Many of the poems are formerly delightful, dappled with quirky portmanteau words and turns of phrasing, which seem as natural as sunlight. Yet, this collection is not without its representations of sorrow; and there are poems about lost love and failing relationships where, to quote from one poem, 'The kissed memories of rainbow sentiments, salt wind and the sand storm, speak from my skin'.

 

 

  A Needle through Night

by Julia Pello

 

A Needle through Night is an experiment in the spontaneous amassing of subjectivities in a non-stop tornado of impressions, deliberations and observations. Like a needle pulling thread, the act of writing extracts and attracts whatever comes within reach, as it seeks exalted states of “inner” revelations through sudden encounters with the outside world, and which might prompt the question: Where or what is the boundary between the supposed interior and exterior?

 

 

  Distorted Reflections

 

by Jeffrey Side

 

 

Poems from another life.

 

 

Commentaries on Bob Cobbing

by Lawrence Upton

Commentaries on Bob Cobbing gathers 26 pieces of varying length on Bob Cobbing. Written between early 1980 and late 2011, these pieces add up to an informed approach to Cobbing by one who worked with him, often as significant collaborator, over three decades.  

 

 

Forgive Me, Tiny Robots

 

by Eric Wayne Dickey

 

 

Forgive Me, Tiny Robots are short poems selected from Eric Wayne Dickey’s twitter feed. They run in reverse chronology from the most recent to the oldest. The real twitter feed is read in reverse chronology, too, but that’s not how they were written. The oldest ones were written first. You can start at the bottom of the page and read up, or start on the last page and read forward. Reading backwards, Dickey’s says, disrupts ‘the natural time sequence’ and is ‘a powerful experience, as if self-dissecting’.

 

 

Collected Poetry Reviews 2004-2013

 

by Jeffrey Side

 

 

A collection of poetry reviews by Jeffrey Side of poetry volumes by various poets during the period 2004 to 2013.

 

 

Show and Tell

 

by Joe Amato

 

 

Show and Tell might properly be called a work of experimental sci-fi. It’s an unconventional amalgam of standard narrative, reportage, film criticism, poetry, cultural commentary, conceptual writing, and science fiction, with an overlay of autobiographical detail that will likely be seen as such only by readers familiar with the author's other work. All told it’s a distinctively postmodern piece of writing that takes some unusual turns even by postmodern standards. It's part of a collection of short fiction, in progress, tentatively entitled The Heights and Weights of Stars.

 

 

The Windows

 

by Paul Hoover

 

 

The Windows is a procedural series of poems developed by Paul Hoover in the years 2007-2013 while producing the poems in Desolation:  Souvenir (Omnidawn, 2012) and Sonnet 56 (Les Figues, 2009), as well as the manuscripts in progress, Gravity’s Children and After Pascal.

 

 

Shadows of the Future: An Otherstream Anthology

 

Edited by Marc Vincenz

 

 

A selection of poetry under represented in both mainstream and avant-garde publishing circles.

 

 

Thirty-Two Short Poems for Bill Bronk, plus One

 

by Mark Weiss

 

William Bronk's work is characterized by extreme care. Metaphors are few and deployed gingerly, and the matter of daily life enters most often just enough to suggest a context. And his concerns are almost exclusively with final things: on the fugitive nature of both the self and any kind of external reality, Being as if lost in the chaos of before the Biblical creation. 'What we want is a here with a meaning' he says in one of his poems, and goes on to demonstrate that we can't have it.

Of this collection of poems inspired by Bronk’s writing practice, Mark Weiss says, ‘Few of these poems dedicated to his practice really attempt to achieve it, and he probably would have found most of them in different ways totally scandalous. Rather, they seem to me to dance around his work as a fixed point. It's in fact “Sometimes,” a poem outside the group, that may come closest to Bill's poetry, though longer than all but a few of his, and I've chosen to place it immediately after them, as a sort of envoi’.

 

Genesis Suicide

 

by Jake berry

 

 

Genesis Suicide is a series of interconnected poems from the perspective of a point in space where the collision of multiple time frames have collapsed into an temporally non-sequential domain. Mythical, prescient, sardonic and whimsical these poems portray a world devoid of comfortable structure where reality itself is as shapeless as water.

 

 

Coleridge’s Early Empiricism

 

by Jeffrey Side

 

 

This study examines the influence of empiricism on Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poetry up until 1800, at which time he deserted it for transcendentalism. This is not to suggest that he was completely an empiricist before 1800, but that his empiricism was somewhat tempered by transcendentalist influences. Therefore, the relationship between “empiricism” and “transcendentalism” in his thinking with regard to poetic composition is problematical. Coleridge became a transcendentalist poet and thinker, whose Biographia Literaria was partly intended to demonstrate the malign effect of the Locke tradition on poetry. Even so, that book is partly a work of self-correction. There is ample evidence of Coleridge’s immersion in empiricist philosophy in the 1790s, as well as in the kind of scientific enquiry that was thought to be congenial to that philosophy.

 

 

Slimvol

 

by Jeffrey Side

 

 

A collection of poems.

 

 

Where the Three Rivers Meet

 

by Aine MacAodha

 

 

Where the Three Rivers Meet is a collection of poems linguistically evocative of 17th century Irish Gaelic poetry, although written in English. The poems are rich with references and imagery that evoke the mythos of Ireland’s ancient history and Celtic traditions. The landscape is also figured, with an affection and respect, not only for its actuality but also for its vitality and mystery. In some respects, this poetry has a connectedness to the ancient traditions and concerns figuratively expressed in various earth religions, as well as in Celtic Christianity.

 

 

Dramatis Personae

 

by Chris McCabe and Tom Jenks

 

 

Dramatis Personae is a selection of the first five collaborations between Chris McCabe and Tom Jenks. This sampler focuses on the ludic world of characters created for dialogue, from Tony Hadley in exchange with Shakespeare, Beckett's Family Fortunes, a version of Ubu Roi in which Pere Ubu is played by Boris Johnson and the minutes of the British Onion Marketing Board in which a gathering of contemporary poets debate the current state of the onion. Jenks and McCabe provide a slice of British life rarely seen outside of the UK's seaside piers in the tourist season.